Relocation, Relocation, Relocation

One query that I receive regularly from my SME clients is how to handle the people aspects of moving business location. Below are some of the common issues and some suggestions on how to deal with them.

a) Can staff refuse to move – even if they have a mobility clause in their contract?

In a word, yes. What many employers don’t realise is that relocation is legally a form of redundancy, since redundancy is defined in law as no longer requiring a particular job role at a specific location. So, you need to comply with the normal rules on consultation (in practice, since companies rarely move at 24 hours’ notice, you will probably have been consulting with staff about the move for some time anyway).

In most cases you will be offering employees an alternative – the same job on the same pay, just in a different location. But in a redundancy situation the question is whether it is ‘suitable’.

If you are relocating from Liverpool to Leeds, the extra travel time and costs, or the need to move house, may mean that it’s not suitable for many employees. Even if they have a mobility clause requiring them to work from ‘company locations’, suitability will still depend on a lot of factors.

Even a small move, which doesn’t appear to have the same issues, can still fall foul of this suitability issue. A move from Manchester City Centre to Salford Quays (roughly 3 miles) probably wouldn’t inconvenience many staff. But an employee with primary school age children, who lives in a commuter town outside Manchester, for example Buxton, may need to get an earlier train to get to work on time, causing problems or increased costs with getting children to school, as well as the extra cost of travel across Manchester. It may not be a ‘suitable alternative’ for them.

So, factor in potential redundancy costs when planning a business relocation – while most of your staff will not have a problem, there may be some who do.

b) Do we have to pay relocation expenses and if so for how long?

There’s no legal requirement to. You may want to, as a gesture of goodwill and to smooth the transition – especially if there are significant extra costs (e.g. having to cross a bridge and pay toll fees). If you do, you can decide or agree how long it is for – some companies will do for between 6 and 12 months.

c) Do we have to replicate facilities e.g. car parking or a canteen?

Only if it is a condition of individuals’ employment that you provide these benefits. If it is then you must do so – or if it isn’t possible provide an equivalent benefit, e.g. a car-parking allowance. If it’s not, then you’re not required to do so.  You might want to take the facilities you currently have into account when choosing your new location.

Remember, moving is disruptive and unsettling for many people – even if they can see the rationale for doing it – and so taking their welfare and personal circumstances into account after a move makes good business sense.

Office buildings as seen from Pall Mall, Liverpool

Left Holding the Baby (and other employment problems)

There are certain questions that crop up regularly among my small business clients, and while every circumstance is slightly different, here’s some advice on how to approach some of these common issues if they occur in your organisation

I’ve an employee who always seems to need time off because of problems with her toddler. Last week she took two days off because he had an upset stomach. Her colleagues are getting a bit fed up with covering for her.

First of all, your employee has a legal right to take unpaid time off if an emergency situation arises with a dependant. This right is restricted to genuine emergencies (for example, if nursery ring to say the child is sick and needs to be collected) and not known issues (such as a hospital appointment for the child), and is also restricted to the time required to put in place alternative arrangements – which depending on the circumstances might be anything from an hour to a day – not to provide the care itself. It would be unusual for an ‘emergency’ to last more than a day. If the individual does need more time off, you may be prepared to allow them to take holidays or some other arrangement, but this is at your discretion.

If the employee seems to have ‘emergencies’ regularly, you can discuss with them the situation and look at ways of resolving it. Current case law suggests that the employee is not entitled to an unlimited use of this right. Consider ways that you might be able to get around the situation – for example short-term changes to working hours, or some other flexible arrangement. In the case of childcare particularly, you might want to discreetly find out if the employee’s partner could assist more (often in these cases it is the mum who ends up dealing with the problem every time, not the dad).

My business trades a lot with the EU and we’re badly affected by Brexit. A few members of our staff are vocally pro-Brexit. Can I sack them for promoting something which is damaging their employer?

Probably not. Although political views are not a ‘protected characteristic’ under the Equality Act, if someone feels they have been dismissed for holding a political opinion they can make an unfair dismissal claim even if they don’t have the normal two years’ service. You would have to have to show that dismissal was a reasonable response – and given that it’s unlikely that you can directly blame your employees for the current situation, it would be difficult to substantiate this.

What you can do is make it clear that people should not be using the workplace to promote political views. Someone who repeatedly broke this rule could be taken through the disciplinary procedure and ultimately dismissed. Make sure you apply the rule consistently though, not just against views that you disagree with!

I’m closing down part of my business in a few months and told the one employee in this area he’d be losing his job, and that he would be doing lower paid work somewhere else in the business. He got very irate and walked off the job, and has never returned. Now he’s threatening constructive dismissal – does he have a case?

Unless you were particularly abrupt or unpleasant in the way you told him or did it in a humiliating way (announcing it unexpectedly in front of colleagues for example), it’s unlikely. You are however putting him at risk of redundancy and needed to consult with him – including on whether the alternative work is suitable (if lower paid, it’s unlikely to be). That could leave you at risk of an unfair dismissal claim if the employee has more than 2 years’ service. As he’s walked off before you could undertake proper consultation, or even give him his legal notice, you are likely to have a defence against a claim, but it could get messy and time-consuming. If he does make a claim, consider settling through ACAS early conciliation or via a Settlement Agreement.