HR Officer Vacancy

I’m currently recruiting a standalone HR Officer role for one of my clients –  the job advert is below:

BTTG is a world renowned organisation within the textile industry. We research, test, audit and provide professional advice to companies worldwide. We’ve grown significantly in recent years thanks to our high quality standards and professional staff, and to support this growth we are now looking to recruit our first in-house HR role.

You will be currently working in HR and have at least a Level 3 CIPD qualification, and be looking for a career move where you can help establish an HR function that contributes to the company’s development. You’ll have a strong current HR knowledge and be able to give credible support to managers, directors and staff across our various businesses. You will be highly organised, capable of working on your own initiative, IT literate and with a commitment to accuracy and high quality. You’ll set up and review our systems, ensuring that they not only fulfil legal requirements but also run in an effective and efficient way.  You’ll have worked with a diverse workforce and ideally will have experience of an international business. Currently we employ around 100 staff with 15% based overseas, and expect this to grow in coming years.

We offer a competitive salary of between £22-25000, together with other benefits, and the opportunity to develop your career. We actively encourage professional development and are willing to support you to obtain your Level 5 CIPD qualification.

For more information about our work, visit www.bttg.co.uk and www.shirleytech.co.uk.

Please send your CV to our external HR Adviser, Simon Jones: simon@ariadne-associates.co.uk.  You can also contact him for more information about the role

Closing Date: Tuesday 4 October 2016. This is a re-advertisement – previous applicants will be reconsidered automatically and do not need to reapply

BTTG is an Equal Opportunities Employer. No Agencies.

Caveat Recruiter

Aspiring Conservative leader (and potential Prime Minister) Andrea Leadsom hit the headlines last week when she was accused of exaggerating her CV, suggesting that she had undertaken more senior roles than she in fact had.

It’s a problem that many businesses – large and small – face in recruitment. How reliable is the information contained in a candidate’s CV?

Most small businesses are unlikely to have the time, or resources, to undertake full background checks on potential candidates. And indeed it hardly creates trust between you and your potential employee if you feel you have to verify every aspect of a candidate’s career history. Having said that, a quick comparison with their LinkedIn profile might be useful!

Clearly, if you discover that a candidate has lied outright (claiming they have a qualification they don’t, or worked in a role or for a company they didn’t) you can withdraw a job offer or even dismiss after they have started.

But in most cases, it will be that a candidate has perhaps oversold their experience. What to do then?

It’s worth remembering that a CV is a marketing document. It is the person’s attempt to impress you as their potential new employer, so it’s understandable that they will want to put a positive spin on their achievements. After all, you don’t put in your brochure or website things like “our products are pretty good but battery life is better in our competitors” And it’s also a fact that individuals and their employers will often collude to make job titles sound more important and prestigious. “Senior HR Executive” implies there are more junior ones when in fact there may not be!

It’s a further reminder that recruitment should be a rigorous process Use interviews to test out the claims in detail. Everyone will accentuate the positive, but good questioning techniques (not this sort of nonsense) and effective listening will allow you to get a better picture of the candidate in front of you and what they actually have done. And you can then decide whether they have broadly the right skills and experience for the role or if you’ve been seduced by their marketing skill!

After all, we don’t complain about advertising unless it’s deliberately misleading; treat your candidates’ CVs in the same way.

 

What’s wrong with this advert?

There’s been a bit of a furore on social media this afternoon about this (apparently genuine) recruitment advert:

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HR professionals will know the answer to the question in the title. Recruitment agencies should, but clearly not all do. But if you’re the owner of a small business, without a great deal of knowledge of employment law, you would expect that retaining an “expert” to assist you with filling a role would ensure that you don’t

a) Contravene the Equality Act. It’s illegal to advertise for someone of a particular sex (with some very clear exceptions) or age, yet this advert visually implies that only young women can be secretaries. As the client, you would be held liable together with the agency if an individual decided to make a claim –  and remember that even someone who didn’t even apply could make a complaint to the EHRC, which might then decide to investigate your company.

b) Send out some very negative messages about your company. The implication that women can only occupy subservient positions to male bosses is hardly likely to attract many good quality candidates, and is the suggestion that errors may result in physical punishment really the impression you want to give of how your company works?

You wouldn’t plan when advertising a job that it would result in you breaking the law or damaging your company’s reputation, yet that’s exactly what has happened here. It doesn’t matter if you or your agency think you are being “witty” by make a reference to a cult movie if your potential candidates (or indeed your customers on a wider basis) find it tasteless and sexist.

Clearly in this case the client were very badly advised by the agency concerned, who themselves seem to lack a basic knowledge of employment law or what’s often referred to as employer branding.  I’m all for doing something original and interesting to set your job advert apart from your competitors, but this isn’t the way to do it. It’s a warning to small businesses to carry out the same checks on the professional advisers you engage as you would do with anyone else you’re entering into business with.