The Magic of a Kind Word?

 

Recent reports have suggested that the Government is considering proposals to make it a legal requirement for an employer to provide a reference for a current or past employee. The rationale appears to be that some employers have used the threat of not providing a reference to ‘silence’ complaints of harassment, especially by women. The proposal has been welcomed by some and criticised in other quarters.

But the question that we should really be asking is why on earth we still, in 2019, expect references anyway?

References were historically designed to allow upper class Victorians to assess the honesty of potential servants. Many a Victorian novel features the ultimate threat of dismissing a servant without a reference – meaning that they would be unemployable in the future. They date back to a world in which employers could operate a closed shop and exclude those who were undesirable – not necessarily dishonest. Given that diversity and inclusion are something the HR profession is supposedly promoting, is persisting with an outdated nineteenth century domestic service practice really a good idea?

And even if you don’t accept that argument, what do references tell us anyway? If I write a glowing reference for Employee X, who worked in my small, flexible organisation, how does that help a new employer  – which is far larger, with a much more bureaucratic and ‘command and control’ culture, assess whether she can do a different job in that company? How does knowing that Employee Y had 10 days off sick in the last year help you manage their attendance in a new company?

The problem is that too many employers use references as an easy get out for their own poor recruitment decisions. “Why did we take him on?” is a frequent question after an employee has left or been dismissed. “Well, his references were good” is an equally frequent reply (usually from HR). It’s as if a reference conveys some sort of magic guarantee of good performance, in the same way that some ancient peoples believed that the hooting of an owl before sowing seeds would guarantee a good crop.

I’m aware that there are some sectors where legally a reference is required (schools, financial organisations etc). But for everyone else, surely the time would be better spent on a more thorough recruitment process, rather than simply generating meaningless paperwork to justify our own decision-making inadequacies. (And as an additional benefit, it couldn’t be used as a threat against employees who do make legitimate complaints)

Image result for victorian servant image copyright free

 

The 12 things HR can do for your business

Last year, I published a post which outlined the 15 things that HR should do – at a minimum – for the people who work within a business. Although I’d argue that doing these things for workers has a positive impact on employers as well, a more sceptical businessperson might wonder if and how their company would benefit from HR. After all, why would you pay for something if you aren’t getting something in return? So here are my 12 reasons why a business would want HR:

1. We’ll make sure that not only do you comply with employment laws, but that we implement them in a way that fits the business strategy and culture

2. We’ll make sure that the business is able to get the right people, in the right number, at the right time.

3. We’ll advise you on the ‘people consequences’ of any business proposals, so that you are taking decisions on the future with full knowledge of all the issues (not just the financial ones)

4. When problems occur with individuals, or groups of employees, we’ll look to find sensible, legal and effective solutions to minimise the damage to the organisation

5. We’ll be your experts in the labour market, knowing what outside factors will have an impact on helping us to deliver – or which need to be overcome to deliver – point 2 above.

6. When changes happen, we’ll understand the best way to minimise disruption and achieve what you want to set out.

7. HR isn’t your business conscience – but we will remind you that you have ethical responsibilities (and normal human emotions) that need to be factored in

8. We’re not your police either – so if we need to put in policies, systems, or procedures,  we’ll make sure they are there for a clear and understandable reason and that everyone understands the consequences of not complying

9. We’ll manage training and development, so that people in the business get the skills they need to do their jobs in a way that’s cost-effective.

10. We’ll use our specialist knowledge to support managers to manage people more effectively

11. If a problem needs a long-term solution, we won’t just offer you a quick fix

12. If there’s a new idea floating around, we’ll look for evidence that it will actually improve things before recommending you implement it

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Human Resources by Nick Youngson CC BY-SA 3.0 Alpha Stock Images

Prepare for the Worst, Hope for the “not too bad”

This week’s parliamentary shenanigans have left the possibility of a “No Deal” Brexit very much on the cards – despite repeated statements from politicians of all sides that No Deal is not what they want.

Given that there is – at the time of writing – only two months to 29 March, the date on which the UK is due to leave, small businesses should be taking steps now to prepare for the worst-case scenario. In HR and employment terms some of the common queries I have had are:

1.       Can I still employ existing staff who come from the EU?

Yes, you can, although they will – after 29 March – need to apply to the Home Office for what is called ‘Settled Status’. Information on the process is available here.  You can continue to employ them while they go through the process. The official Government position – for what it is worth – is that unless there is a specific reason to deny settled status (e.g. criminal convictions) it will be granted.

If there is a deal, they will still have to apply for settled status but have up to 31 December 2020 to make their application.

People who have been in the UK for less than 5 years may only be allowed to apply for “Pre-Settled Status”. You will still be able to continue to employ them provided they have applied for,  and then been granted this.

2.      Can I recruit people from the EU after 29 March?

If there is a deal (with a transitional period) then yes. But if there’s no deal, then the situation is very unclear.

The worst-case situation is that new recruits from EU countries will need to meet the same or similar criteria to workers from other countries. This will mean applying for work visas (the new name for work permits) and registering your company as a sponsor organisation. This is a long-winded and convoluted procedure which many small firms have avoided in the past precisely for that reason. There are proposals to change the system, but they haven’t as yet been agreed or implemented.

If your business uses short-term ‘low skill’ labour (e.g. seasonal agricultural or hospitality staff) then there are proposals to implement a scheme of 12-month visas which will allow people to work in the UK temporarily. Again however it needs to be stressed that these are still only proposals.

Whatever system is put in place, employers will still be expected to carry out the normal “right to work” checks before employing someone.

3.     What if supplies are disrupted – can we lay staff off temporarily?

It depends – read my full post on this issue here.

4.    What about existing staff who need to travel to EU countries for work?

If there is a no-deal, the EU has said that people from the UK should not need a visa to travel to EU countries for short holidays or business trips. They will however need to apply for an ETIAS “visa waiver” document (similar to the ESTA scheme operated by the USA) every 3 years.

If you have business trips planned at the end of March or early April, there is the possibility of flight disruption.

If you have staff driving in Europe – whether this is for business trips or delivering freight –  you will have to make sure that all drivers carry a “Green Card” to show they have insurance. As this can take a month to process, you will need to apply by the end of February at the latest.

It’s also likely that in a no-deal situation, the EHIC card – which allows people to receive free health service treatment in any EU country – will no longer apply to UK citizens. So you will need to make sure that you have adequate health insurance for any employees travelling outside the UK.

The situation is extremely fluid at the moment. Although the information is correct at the time of publication, it may not be in a day or so. Keep an eye out for future posts. If you have a Brexit-related HR or employment question that isn’t covered here, please get in touch